lexlingua: (Contemplation)



The youngest, half-goblin son of the Emperor has lived his entire life in exile, distant from the Imperial Court and the deadly intrigue that suffuses it. But when his father and three sons in line for the throne are killed in an "accident," he has no choice but to take his place as the only surviving rightful heir.

Entirely unschooled in the art of court politics, he has no friends, no advisors, and the sure knowledge that whoever assassinated his father and brothers could make an attempt on his life at any moment.

Surrounded by sycophants eager to curry favor with the naïve new emperor, and overwhelmed by the burdens of his new life, he can trust nobody. Amid the swirl of plots to depose him, offers of arranged marriages, and the specter of the unknown conspirators who lurk in the shadows, he must quickly adjust to life as the Goblin Emperor. All the while, he is alone, and trying to find even a single friend . . . and hoping for the possibility of romance, yet also vigilant against the unseen enemies that threaten him, lest he lose his throne-or his life.


I picked up this book last year, only to shelve it again within the first few pages itself. This cycle repeated again and again; the only reason I didn't give up on it entirely is because I felt too bad about dismissing a book as DNF without giving it even twenty odd pages, especially when everyone I knew was positively raving about it. Finally, I took up the audiobook -- and lo and behold, I finally realized why The Goblin Emperor makes for such a great read.

Simply put, this is the tale of how the underdog became emperor, and who doesn't love the underdog winning?

Read more... )
lexlingua: (Contemplation)

I know they say that don’t judge a book by its cover. But who can resist being drawn to The Flame of Sevenwaters, when its cover art has been sketched so beautifully by John Jude Palencar? Seriously, this artist has contributed to the most —according to me—gorgeous cover art ever, including the ones for the Inheritance series, Angels of Samaria series, books by Charles de Lint, and of course, the Sevenwaters series. What is curious is that unconsciously each one of these has been a favourite of mine at one point or the other.

Flame of Sevenwaters cover   

Anyways, skipping past the art... The Flame of Sevenwaters by Juliet Marillier is the sixth book in the series, and its story is just as gorgeous as its cover. Maeve, a girl who was burnt and scarred permanently by a fire (previously described in one of the books) caused by certain evil forces, was sent away by her family to her healer aunt for better care and safety. Now it is time for Maeve to return home after ten years— to a place called Sevenwaters.

Here's the Amazon Book Blurb:

Maeve, daughter of Lord Sean of Sevenwaters, was badly burned as a child and carries the legacy of that fire in her crippled hands. After ten years, she’s returning home, having grown into a courageous, forthright woman with a special gift for gentling difficult animals. But while her body’s scars have healed, her spirit remains fragile, fearing the shadows of her past.

Sevenwaters is in turmoil. The fey prince Mac Dara has become desperate to see his only son, married to Maeve’s sister, return to the Otherworld. To force Lord Sean’s hand, Mac Dara has caused a party of innocent travelers on the Sevenwaters border to vanish—only to allow their murdered bodies to be found, one by one.

When Maeve finds the body of one of the missing men in a remote part of the woods, she and her brother Finbar embark on a journey that may bring about the end of Mac Dara’s reign, or lead to a hideous death. If she is successful, Maeve may open the door to a future she has not dared to believe possible…

Read the review... )

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